Guyra veteran Ted Mulligan served in the Light Horse in WW2

REMEMBERING THE FALLEN: Former light horseman Ted Mulligan received the keys to Guyra at a special ceremony days before his 100th birthday late last year. Mr Mulligan was a member of the 12th Light Horse Brigade.

REMEMBERING THE FALLEN: Former light horseman Ted Mulligan received the keys to Guyra at a special ceremony days before his 100th birthday late last year. Mr Mulligan was a member of the 12th Light Horse Brigade.

Guyra WWII veteran Ted Mulligan is now the last surviving member of his generation in the family.

He was awarded an Order of Australia in 2006 and is the recipient of 10 bravery and service medals.

He was also a member of the 12th Light Horse Brigade in 1938 and one of the first six servicemen in Australia to learn to drive tanks in World War II.

At 91 years old, just nine years ago, Mr Mulligan headed to Israel, to participate in a special ceremony which dedicated a memorial to the people of Beersheba.

The legend of the Light Horse, whose historic cavalry charge at Beersheba in 1917 proved a turning point in the desert campaign, lives on.

That charge, of 800 men and horses across six kilometres of open ground, made the Light Horse a byword for a particularly swashbuckling brand of Anzac bravery.

There is a memorial to the Australian Light Horse at Tamworth which was unveiled in October 2005.

REMEMBERING THE FALLEN: Former light horseman Ted Mulligan receiving the keys to Guyra at a special ceremony days before his 100th birthday late last year.

REMEMBERING THE FALLEN: Former light horseman Ted Mulligan receiving the keys to Guyra at a special ceremony days before his 100th birthday late last year.

A number of units still exist today, including the 2nd and 14th Light Horse Regiment.

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